Skills and Applications – ASCH Level II (Intermediate) Clinical Hypnosis Training

Attending the second level of training in Clinical Hypnosis is an important step towards proficiency and confidence in offering hypnotic interventions to diverse populations and symptom presentations.

Whether your Fundamental – Level I (Basic) training in Clinical Hypnosis was 6 months or 6 years ago, this training will meet you where you are and help you build on to your “how to” techniques from the Fundamental course, and refresh, solidify, broaden, and refine your hypnotic skills and strategies.

Similar to the Fundamental training, the Level II course will offer you learning through didactic presentations, demonstrations and small-group practices, so that new information can be integrated and become available to you in your clinical practice. Our learning community will be capped at 21 participants and 3 instructors to facilitate an optimal learning environment. Your instructors will be ASCH approved consultants with decades of clinical experience offering hypnosis.

We will address the following topics on the utilization of clinical hypnosis:

  • Creative use of language for hypnotic interventions
  • Working with Children
  • Trauma based disorders
  • Habit Disorders
  • Anxiety Disorders
  • Sleep Disorders
  • Medical procedures, pain management, acute/chronic illness (Headaches/IBS)
  • Treatment Planning

If you are pursuing the increasingly more sought-after certification by ASCH, the American Society of Clinical Hypnosis, the Level II training will offer 20 hours towards the 60-hour ASCH certification (credits pending). In addition, 20 CEs towards your professional licensure requirements will be made available.

If you would like additional information, feel free to contact Reinhild Draeger-Muenke, PsyD, LMFT, Chair, at dr.reinhild.muenke@gmail.com


Registration Details

All participants are required to have completed an ASCH Level I training or its equivalent in order to take this training. Please submit proof of this training to ISSTD via email at info@isst-d.org within 72 hours of registering.

Group rates are available for groups of five or more from the same hospital, facility, or university. Please email the ISSTD HQ for assistance with group rates.

Cancellation Policy
Cancellations prior to the training are subject to a $45 cancelation fee. No refund are provided for no shows. The deadline for cancellations with a refund is Tuesday, October 1 at 5:00pm EDT.

Registration Contact Information
Email: info@isst-d.org
Phone: 202.803.6332
Fax: 202.747.2864

Faculty

Meet our Faculty

Reinhild Draeger-Muenke, PsyD, LMFT is a licensed clinical psychologist and licensed family therapist in private practice in Bala Cynwyd, PA, working with traumatized individuals, couples and families across the life span. She is an ASCH Life Fellow, Approved Consultant, Past Co-Chair of Education, Past Moderator, Regional Workshop Chair; Past President Greater Philadelphia Society of Clinical Hypnosis. She presents and provides training on the topic of clinical hypnosis in mind-body health.

J. Gina Manlove, ACSW, LCSW, LCSW-C, LICSW is a clinical social worker with a private practice in Arlington, VA. She has provided psychotherapeutic and mental health services for over 30 years. Ms. Manlove continues her work with children, adolescents, adults, couples and families as well as providing consultation in school, medical, and mental health settings. Ms. Manlove has been an adjunct faculty member in the Department of Social Work at George Mason University, Fairfax, VA. She currently is a member of the Board of Directors for Project Aware- Fairfax County School District. Ms. Manlove has been a member of the Board of Directors for NASW-VA since 2012 and currently serves as Secretary on the Executive Committee.

Ms. Manlove has presented at professional conferences and workshops for the Virginia Department of Education, the National Association of Social Workers- Virginia, and the International Society for the Study of Trauma and Dissociative Disorders. She has presented since 2002 at the Minnesota Society of Clinical Hypnosis Annual Conference. She has also served on the Board of Directors for the Minnesota Society of Clinical Hypnosis and was the recipient of the MSCH-Daniel Kohen, MN Clinician of the Year Award in 2009. 

Ms. Manlove is certified to provide Clinical Supervision in the state of Virginia. She is also an American Society of Clinical Hypnosis Approved Consultant certified to provide professional consultation.

Wendy Lemke, MS is a licensed psychologist, teacher, clinician, and an ASCH approved consultant. She has served as Vice President of ASCH and other board positions but she’s perhaps best known for her passionate teaching and consulting in the field of hypnosis. She was instrumental in bringing the first basic clinical hypnosis conferences to ISSTD and continues to teach hypnosis and conferences and serve as a consultant nationally and internationally. She has published in the field and produced two self-hypnosis CD’s and is an active ISSTD member and Fellow.

Schedule and Content

DAY 1

8:30 AM – 9:00 AM
Registration and Light Continental Breakfast

9:00 AM – 9:30 AM
Welcome and Orientation

BLOCK 1

9:30 AM – 10:30 AM        
Review and Practice of Fundamental and Intermediate Formal Hypnotic Induction Techniques   

Instructors:   
R. Draeger-Muenke,W. Lemke, G. Manlove

Content:
Demonstration of fundamental and intermediate hypnotic evocation/induction (arm levitation, catalepsy, reverse levitation, eye opening/closing, nonverbal). Discussion of indications and contraindications.

Dyadic practice of fundamental and intermediate evocation/induction procedures.

Learning Goals:

  • Participants will be able to name fundamental and intermediate hypnotic inductions, their indications and contraindications.
  • Participants will be able to evoke, intensify, utilize, and reorient from an invited formal trance experience.

References:

  • Barabasz, A., & Watkins, JG. (2005). Hypnotherapeutic Techniques 2E.  New York, NY: Brunner-Routlege.

10:30 AM – 11:00 AM
Break

BLOCK 2

11:00 AM – 12:30 PM    
Hypnotic Language: Creating Metaphors and Indirect Suggestions for Change

Instructor:     
R. Draeger-Muenke   

Content:
Demonstration and experience of principles of constructing therapeutic metaphors. Demonstration and practice of formulating indirect suggestions to aid in constructive absorption and ego-strengthening self-exploration.

Learning Goals:

  • Participants will be able to demonstrate the construction of a therapeutic metaphor to be used as a hypnotic suggestion.
  • Participants will be able to provide at least two examples of therapeutic metaphors for ego strengthening and self-exploration.
  • Participants will be able to describe the process of collaboratively creating metaphors and suggestions to promote desired change. 

References:

  • Lankton, C., & Lankton, S. (1989). Tales of Enchantment. Goal-Oriented Metaphors  for Adults and Children in Therapy. New York: Brunner Mazel.
  • Rosen, S. (1982). My Voice Will Go With You. The Teaching Tales of Milton H. Erickson. New York: Norton.
  • Wallas, L. (1985). Stories for the Third Ear. Using Hypnotic Fables in Psychotherapy. New York: Norton.

12:30 PM – 1:30 PM
Lunch

BLOCK 3

1:30 PM – 2:30 PM 
Ideomotor Signaling as an Exploratory Technique

Faculty:   
G. Manlove

Content:
Discussion and demonstration of Cheek/LeCron’s Ideomotor Technique. Co-construction of a case-based ideomotor exploration.

Discussion and demonstration of Cheek/LeCron’s Ideomotor Technique. Co-construction of a case-based ideomotor exploration.

Learning Goals:

  • Participants will be able to identify D. Ewin’s components of ideomotor questioning/exploration.
  • Participants will experience ideomotor signaling.

References:

  • Cheek, D.B., & LeCron, L.M. (1968). Clinical Hypnotherapy. New York, NY: Grune and Stratton.
  • Ewin, D. M., & Eimer, B.N. (2006). Ideomotor signals for rapid hypnoanalysis. Springfield, IL: Charles C. Thomas.

2:30 PM – 2:45 PM
Break

BLOCK 4

2:45 PM – 4:45 PM         
Small Group Practice 1                                      
Facilitating Intermediate Level Hypnotic Phenomena

Faculty:
R. Draeger-Muenke, W. Lemke, G. Manlove

Content:
Participants practice Intermediate-level techniques to elicit, intensify, utilize, and reorient from trance. Utilization of ideomotor signaling, metaphors and indirect suggestions for ego-strengthening.

Faculty and participants will give feedback. 

Learning Goals:

  • Each participant will practice at least once being the facilitator, subject, and observer

4:45 PM – 5:15 PM
Break

BLOCK 5

5:15 PM – 6:45 PM    
Hypnotic strategies based on Ego State therapy principles for the treatment of trauma

Faculty:  
W. Lemke

Content:
Accessing ego states, working with them for symptom management and improved functioning, affect regulation, developmental repair, and managing traumatic memories.

Learning Goals:

  • Participants will be able to at least three principles of Ego State therapy including hypnotic applications based on those principles.
  • Participants will be able to describe three hypnotic suggestions for accessing ego states.

References:

  • Lemke, W. (2005). Utilizing Hypnosis and Ego-State Therapy to Facilitate Healthy Adaptive Differentiation in the Treatment of Sexual Disorders. The American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis 47(3):179-89.
  • Phillips, M., & Frederick, C. (2010). Empowering the self through ego-state therapy. Available at http://www.reversingchronicpain.com/prof.html
  • Watkins, J.G., & Watkins, H.H. (1997). Ego states theory and therapy. New York, NY: Norton.
  • Watkins, J.G. (1971). The affect bridge: A hypnoanalytic technique. The International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis, XIX, 21-27.

DAY 2

8:30 AM – 9:00 AM
Light Continental Breakfast

BLOCK 6

9:00 AM – 10:30 AM   
Insight-Oriented and Exploratory Hypnotic Techniques – Creativity, Playfulness, and Safety for Self-Discovery

Faculty:   
G. Manlove

Content:
Discussion of therapeutic considerations/indications for the utilization of insight-oriented and exploratory hypnotic techniques.

Description and demonstration of hypno-projective techniques (Frazer’s Dissociative Table, Approach and distancing techniques)

Invitation to experience a hypno-projective technique.

Learning Goals:                     

  • Participants will be able to discuss indications and contraindications for using an insight-oriented hypnotic approach in the exploratory phase of the treatment of trauma and dissociation
  • Participants will be able to describe at least three exploratory hypnotic techniques.     

References:

  • Brown, D.P., & Fromm, E. (1986). Hypnotherapy and hypnoanalysis. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Earlbaum.
  • Hammond, D.C. (1990). Handbook of hypnotic suggestions and metaphors. New York, NY: Norton.
  • Martin, K.M. (2012). How to use Fraser’s Dissociative Table Technique to access and work with Emotional Parts of the personality. Journal of EMDR Practice and Research, 6 (4), 179-186.

10:30 AM – 11:00 AM
Break

BLOCK 7

11:00 AM – 1:00 PM 
Small Group Practice 2  
Utilization of an Exploratory Technique

Faculty:
R. Draeger-Muenke, W. Lemke, G. Manlove

Content:
Participants practice Intermediate-level techniques to elicit, intensify, utilize, and reorient from trance. Utilization of ideomotor signaling, metaphors and indirect suggestions for exploration of a personal resource.

Faculty and participants will give feedback. 

Learning Goals:

  • Each participant will practice at least once being the facilitator, subject, and observer.

1:00 PM -2:00 PM
Lunch

BLOCK 8

2:00 PM – 3:00 PM     
Hypnotic Strategies for Pain Management and Somatic Concerns                                                            

Faculty: 
R. Draeger-Muenke

Content:
Information on the interplay of physical and emotional pain. Information, demonstration, and experience of altering physical sensations with hypnosis (hand warming/cooling, controls , glove anesthesia). Contraindications of treating pain hypnotically.

Learning Goals:

  • Participants will be able to identify at least two exclusion criteria for hypnotic pain management.
  • Participants will be able to name suggestions for the alteration of sensations and for glove anesthesia.

References:

  • Jensen, M.P. (2011). Hypnosis for chronic pain management: Therapist Guide. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
  • Palsson, O.S., & Van Tilburg, M.(2015). Hypnosis and guided imagery treatment for gastrointestinal disorders: Experience with scripted protocols developed at the University of North Carolina. American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis, 58, 15-21.
  • Patterson, D.R. (2010). Clinical hypnosis for pain control, Washington D.C.: American Psychological Association.

3:00 PM – 3:30 PM
Break

BLOCK 9

3:30 PM – 5:30 PM           
Small Group Practice 3                                  
Hypnotic Pain Management Techniques   

Faculty: 
R. Draeger-Muenke, W. Lemke, G. Manlove

Content:
Participants practice Intermediate-level techniques to elicit, intensify, utilize, and reorient from trance. Utilization of ideomotor signaling, metaphors and indirect suggestions for exploration of a personal resource.

Faculty and participants will give feedback.

Learning Goals:

  • Each participant will practice at least once being the facilitator, subject, and observer.

DAY 3

8:30 AM – 9:00 AM
Light Continental Breakfast

BLOCK 10

9:00 AM – 10: 30 AM   
Hypnotic Interventions for Trauma and Dissociative Symptoms                                                          

Faculty: 
W. Lemke

Content:
Discussion of hypnotic interventions for affect regulation and ego strengthening. Presentation of methods of titration of hypnotic exploration via slow leak/fractionated/  distancing techniques.  

Learning Goals:

  • Participants will be able to identify two salient features of managing the intensity of hypnotic exploration.
  • Participants will be able to name two hypnotic interventions for resourcing.

References:

  • Fine, C. (1991). Treatment stabilization and crisis prevention. Pacing the therapy of the MPD patient. Psychiatric Clinics of North-America, 14, 661-676.
  • Kluft, R.P. (1980).On treating the older patient with Multiple Personality Disorder: “Race against time” or “Make haste slowly?” American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis, 30(4), 257-266.
  • Kluft, R.P. (1990a). The fractionated abreactive technique. In: C.D. Hammond (Ed.), Handbook of hypnotic suggestions and metaphors (pp. 527-528). New York, NY: Norton.
  • Kluft, R.P. (1990b). The slow leak technique. In: C.D. Hammond (Ed.), Handbook of hypnotic suggestions and metaphors (pp. 526-527). New York, NY: Norton.
  • Lemke, W. (2007). Fostering internal cooperation through the use of imagery in the treatment of dissociative identity disorder. Journal of Trauma & Dissociation8(4), 53-68

10:30 AM – 11:00 AM
Break

BLOCK 11

11:00 AM – 12.30 PM
Hypnotic Interventions for Anxiety and Habit Disorders                

Faculty:
G. Manlove

Content:
Discussion and demonstration of affect bridge, split screen technique, imaginal exposure, mental rehearsal, future template/success imagery, hypnosis assisted systematic desensitization.

Learning Goals:

  • Participants will be able to identify two salient features of hypnosis in affect regulation in anxiety and habit disorders.
  • Participants will be able to name two hypnotic interventions for future template rehearsal.

References:

  • Alladin, A. (2016). Cognitive hypnotherapy for accessing and healing emotional injuries for anxiety disorders. American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis 59 (1), 24-46.
  • Kohen, D.P. (2016). Nail biting. In Gary Elkins (Ed.), Handbook of medical and psychological hypnosis, foundations applications, and professional issues. New York, NY: Springer.
  • Yapko, M.D. (2004). Trancework. An introduction to the practice of clinical hypnosis. (3rd ed.). New York, NY: Brunner/Mazel.
  • Zarren, J.I.& Eimer, B.N.,(2002). B.N. Brief cognitive hypnosis. Facilitating the change of dysfunctional behavior. New York, NY: Springer.

12:30 PM – 1:30 PM
Lunch

BLOCK 12

1:30 PM – 2:30 PM  
Working With Children And the Child Within

Faculty: 
R. Draeger-Muenke

Content:
Adaptation of hypnotic interventions to developmental age of the child / child part. Discussion of child-specific hypnotic language and strategies. Special considerations of working with child parts of the personality.

Learning Goals:

  • Define at least three ways in which working with children is different from working with adults.
  • Identify at least two hypnotic strategies for the different developmental levels.
  • Name at least two considerations in working with younger parts of the mind.

References:

  • Anbar, R (Ed.) (2011 June). Special Issue: Pediatric Hypnosis. American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis, 54, 1.
  • Kohen, D, Olness, K (4/2011). Hypnosis and Hypnotherapy with Children. NewYork, NY: Routledge.
  • Kluft, R.P. (2012). Hypnosis in the treatment of Dissociative Identity Disorder and allied states: an overview and case study. South African Journal of Psychology, 42(2), 146-155.

2:30 PM – 2:45 PM
Break

BLOCK 13

2:45 PM – 3:45 PM   
Ethical Integration of Hypnosis Into Trauma Practice

Faculty: 
R. Draeger-Muenke, W. Lemke, G. Manlove

Content:
Ethical considerations in the integration of hypnosis into general trauma practice – collaborative discussion utilizing case material. Addressing legal and medical caveats, treatment alliance, client stability.

Learning Goals:

  • Participants will be able to define at least two ethical considerations in offering hypnosis in trauma treatment.
  • Participants will be able to name at least two criteria to determine whether the use of hypnosis is appropriate.

References:

3:45 PM – 4:15 PM
Next Steps, Wrap Up and Certificates

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Explore DC’s nightlife and a flourishing dining scene that has been rewarded with three Michelin Guides. Near the Walter E. Washington Convention Center, attendees and visitors can enjoy acclaimed new restaurants, including Marjorie Meek-Bradley’s Smoked and Stacked and All-Purpose Pizzeria.

DC offers unique cultural diversity, pairing international influence with a distinct local identity. It’s easy to access and navigate through three airports. Traversing the city is simple, whether by foot, via bike rental with Capital Bikeshare or through the city’s efficient Metrorail system. The nation’s capital is a go-to destination for a successful and unforgettable visit.

For more information, visit washington.org.

Venue Information

ISSTD Headquarters
1420 New York Avenue NW
5th Floor
Washington, DC 20005

Closest Metro Stops
Metro Center (Red, Orange, Silver, and Blue Lines)
McPherson Square (Orange, Silver, and Blue Lines)

There are several parking garages within walking distance if you plan to drive.

The building is access controlled and you will need to be escorted from the lobby to the 5th floor. Please plan to arrive 15-30 minutes before the listed start time of training each day as a staff member will be on hand during this timeframe to let you up to the training room. If you are running late, please email info@isst-d.org to arrange for access at a later time.